evolving consciousness is our primary duty

Something else from the Collective Evolution post about expanding consciousness:

Enlightenment is simply the process of remembering who we truly are, and why we are here. The soul will require many lives to completely remember itself, and what it truly is. By living and experiencing each day, we are all gaining experiences and moving closer to englightenment.

And an interesting persepctive on the source of ego, no less. I don’t really buy into the whole puppet-master-mind theory, which seems to imply that our leaders have a degree of capacity I just haven’t seen them demonstrate – such speculation about human intelligent design just doesn’t feel convincing for me, but I guess argument is not directed at people who are familiar with feeling conviction, which obviously feels like a contradiction, yep.

Conspiracy theories aside, this film left me all zen about the feeling that personal change at a consciousness level is the primary and most-effective means for effecting change in the world – from internal to external.

The way i scribbled it down late last night after the lunar eclipse: the clip from CE reminded me 1.) if we are going through cycle after cycle until we awaken to who we are and this iteration is just unevolved, and 2.) our main purpose is to evolve enough to come home to our original source, the ideal condition, and 3.) enlightenment is just remembering who we are, then 4.) all we need to do is pursue home inside ourselves.

Sounds easy enough!

It’s a view Osho reminded me of, and which he goes into at length in his talk about meditation being the greatest charity. You can find the talk here as an eBook, or try downloading it here as an audio talk. I don’t know which file it is here, as i haven’t downloaded them all from here myself yet, but that audio link is to the full series of talks called The Rebellious Spirit, yep!

There is a quote from Einstein at the end, which I suspect is edited from the original, but whatever:

No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created it.

We all know it. So let’s do it.

Advertisements

Osho on reincarnation

photo-1

enlightened master

It is neither true nor false. It is a device; it is a device to help people.

You cannot understand the language of freedom, but you can understand the language of fear. Freedom cannot be said to you, but fear – yes, you can understand that. Death you can understand, you cannot understand life. So he says the day of judgement is coming near. And Jesus says, “There is only one life. Once lost, lost for ever.” That’s why Jesus never used the Indian device of reincarnation.

All the three religions born in the West – Jews, Mohammedans, Christians – they have never used the Indian device. All the religions born in the East – Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism – they have all used the device of reincarnation. The situations were different. I will tell you why they used the device. And when people come to me and ask me, “Is reincarnation a true doctrine?” I sa, “Po.” It is neither true nor false. It is a device; it is a device to help people.

Link.

romantic love

Dad would like Osho

Dad would like Osho

My dad taught me something like the above quote from Osho: Dad was an orchid fanatic, and he used to drag us around the Adelaide Hills and say, “The only thing you should leave in the bush is footprints, and the only think you should take out is photographs.” Dad would like Osho if he knew that he has this to say about flowers.

Continue reading

Starting to Breathe, Part V

a rambling five-part exploration of how spiritual healing must complement lifestyle changes that will facilitate spiritual healing – Part IV is here

My Program

This thing i call my Program is an attempt at lifestyle design, an accumulation of things i’ve picked up from various approaches to personal development – mostly approaches based on the sort of self-help you find in the chain bookstores and on websites about productivity,

and even as i’ve been mulling over how to explain the Program i’ve been coming to realise that productivity- or achievement-based approaches to personal development are mostly bubkis, fraught with difficulties and maybe even doomed to failure,

tied up with the same old paradigm i am escaping from, a paradigm based on quantifiable outcomes, linear intellectual understanding, materialism and rationality.

For example, i use an iPhone app called Way of Life, a program designed for you to track progress in the formation of new (positive) habits or the dissolution of old (negative) ones.

Way of Life

Continue reading

Starting to Breathe, Part IV

a rambling five-part exploration of how spiritual healing must complement lifestyle changes that will facilitate spiritual healing – Part III is here

The Porn Tangent

It feels like another start because i can’t go back now. I don’t want to just fall back on false resources, smoking and drinking and over-eating and looking at porn. That one’s a big one, and sensitive: my dependence on porn. I actually can’t remember the last time i looked at porn, though i’ve had ample opportunity. I haven’t had the desire. But now, in my currently fragile state, i feel the desire.

But i see it for what it is: a desire to feel some kind of instant pleasure; pretty women are beautiful, and i get pleasure from seeing them with cum on their faces :/ That is perversion, an unnatural desire.

I was positively effected by the TEDx talk below from Ran Gavrieli about how unnatural desire can emerge in us from watching modern porn. As my sexuality burgeoned in my early adolescence i didn’t have this desire. It is a desire that has grown, been unconsciously cultivated, by my exposure to and previously indiscriminate/unaware consumption of whatever porn i could access on the internet, which is mostly cumshots.

.

Continue reading

Starting to Breathe, Part III

a rambling five-part exploration of how spiritual healing must complement lifestyle changes that will facilitate spiritual healing – Part II is here

Turkey

I arrived in December 2013 on a three-week luxury bus tour with my mother. I am still here, seven months later – though i’m writing from Lesvos, a Greek island a few hours off the west coast of Turkey.

Leaving the Eden Hills sanctuary in Australia, i was worried that i would allow myself to be derailed from the progress i was making. So be it: in Istanbul i took up smoking again, stumbled in love and fell, and gradually plummeted back into despair.

I started drinking again, smoking weed … but in a new way. Even in my despair i knew that something had shifted when i was at Eden Hills – something had shifted in me and made way for the growth of self-love, which cannot co-exist with the sort of self-hate that had previously left me seeking oblivion in consumption and other external sources. I had resumed attempting to fill myself up from without, but i was more aware that this was what i was doing.

The relationship broke down as i accepted that external romatic love is just another thing i was eating, trying to fill myself up from without, when what i knew i really needed was a practice to cultivate self-love. We tried to be friends and walked some days on the Lycian Way together, but things broke down further in Kaş and we went our separate ways.

Pained by another cherished friendship jeopardised, i was alone again, and homeless, again. So i walked forth into homelessness and arrived at Çıralı, a lot sad but mostly happy and relieved that my pilgrimage had resumed. Another start.

In Çıralı i met a young Italian woman and an old Turkish man. We communed, and Maddy inspired me to travel back up the west coast to the Mount Ida region, where an Osho festival was being held. We had been talking about our respective practices, and i about how mine had waned. I said i couldn’t get back to Thailand until December, as though my practice is somehow dependent on place, which, to some extent, it is for now – i need/want to be in an environment conducive to meditation and the lifestyle practices that support the inner journey.

I have not yet cultivated enough of an inner sanctuary that will mean i can carry my practice with me wherever i go. Meanwhile i oscillate between strong practice, lackadaisical drifting and binge alcoholism.

Drifting is important, though. I was reading Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance at the time, which helped me understand that sometimes drifting is a necessary part of our life process. I was drifting when i arrived at Çıralı, and i was drifting as i sat in Yilmaz’s beer garden, talking to Maddy and Özer.

The important thing about drifting is you eventually bump into something. I bumped into Maddy, and i bumped into her reply to my saying i couldn’t be in Thailand until December, which was the simple, profound question: “Why?”, a two-fold question: on the surface it meant Why can’t you go to Thailand now?; underneath it also meant Why can’t you practice now?

There are logistical reasons i can’t be in Thailand now, but there is no reason i can’t practice now.

So i went to the Osho festival, and from there i went to Osho Afroz in Greece. In Turkey we did a lot of daily Osho meditations and group sessions with various therapists, one of whom was Giten, a breathwork and trauma-release specialist.

In Greece we finished an eight-day course in breathwork training.

What i learned in the course is that i do not know how to breathe properly (gasp!); i have almost no inner connection with my body; i have much tension to let go of, and i am learning how to do so with breathing; my chakra system is in a sorry state of disrepair; i am disconnected from my core creative energy; i have many mechanisms for keeping myself separate from this core, from myself, others and the divine love of the universe; i am afraid of how i will feel without these mechanisms.

In the first days of the course i touched a deep sense of peace and joy, but for last days I felt utterly terrible, deeply ashamed.

I have learned that when i connect with and accept the trauma that has lead to the development of such mechanisms i begin to heal, but that healing is often painful. It feels trite to say that we must go through the darkness to get to the light, but i feel that is a fundamental truth of self-healing. As Florence Welch says, “It’s always darkest before the dawn.”

 

Continue reading